• 1930s
    Double distilled, very dry - an extremely rare early example of this delicious liqueur flavoured with caraway, cumin and fennel. Interesting to sample straight up or on the rocks as a digestive, or as an ingredient in a classic cocktail such as the Savoy Cocktail book's Silver Bullet.
  • 1905
    First produced in 1823 by James Pimm, this bottle is from the brands first heydey, when it was owned by Frederick Sawyer, lord mayor of London. Bottles of this age are very rare; a unique taste of British drinking history.
  • 1940s
    Produced during the Second World War, in the heyday of the Boston distillery, made famous by it's "Old Mr. Boston" official bartenders guides, labelled the "Bible Of Booze". This would have been the chief ingredient in a favourite cocktail of the time - the sloe gin fizz.
  • 1895
    An extremely rare agricole rhum from the island of Martinique originally belonging to a retired sea captain from the 19th century - an aged example as opposed to the more common white agricoles of today. A deeply satisfying sipping rhum without equivalent in the present day.
  • John & William Hardie began their quest to create the prefect blended scotch whisky in 1880, using only the finest and rarest Scottish malts, first blended in 1888, "The Antiquary" is named after a novel by the famous Scottish author sir Walter Scott.
  • Glengelt Old Scotch
  • Hiram Walker Distillery, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. A fascinating piece of history. Walker's Deluxe was and still is produced by the company famous for Canadian Club. This bottle was produced during the latter days of prohibition and shipped to California "for medicinal purposes".
  • 1930s
    From the original brand distilled in Pennsylvania, USA still a cherished brand of rye, though now produced by Heaven Hill in Kentucky. This bottle is an example of the original product, which was first produced in 1933 with the end of prohibition.
  • Pre-prohibition
    From the Monticello Distillery in Baltimore, Maryland. USA. From a distillery established in the 1880s. A fine example of Maryland rye, and favourite brand of journalist and staunch anti-prohibitionist H.L. Mencken, the "Sage of Baltimore".
  • 1863
    From the Hannis distillery of West Virginia, USA. An extremely rare example of pre-prohibition rye whiskey. The best rye we have tasted bar none. Nightjar acquired the last supply of Hannisville Rye available for purchase.
  • c. 1910
    From the Hannis Distillery of West Virginia, USA. A pre-Prohibition 'Old Tom' style gin of the type popular in both the UK and US toward the end of the 19th Century. This type of gin was specified in many of the gin cocktails in the earliest bartender guides. 'A once in a lifetime drinking encounter to experience and wonder about.'
  • 1910
    From the Chateau de Bourg Cognac House, owned by the Marnier Lapastolle family known as the producers of Grand Marnier. A fine example of cognac produced just as the quality of vineyards had recovered from the Phylloxera epidemic of a generation before.
  • 1930s
    Hiram Walker Distillery, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. A fascinating piece of history. Walker's deluxe was and still is produced by the company famous for Canadian Club. This bottle was produced during the latter days of Prohibition and shipped to California for 'medicinal purposes'.
  • Believed Distilled 1860s
    From the Hannis Distillery of West Virginia, USA Produced by the same long-lost distillery as our Hannisville Rye. Another true time capsule experience to the days of Jerry Thomas and Harry Johnson, godfathers of the cocktail. Extremely limited supply.

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